Heart disease is a major problem.

The US Government states it IS the leading cause of death for women in this country. One out of three women dies each year from heart disease in the United States. The disease we are most frightened of as women is breast cancer. In this country breast cancer kills 1 out of 30 women. In fact, heart disease kills more women in this country each year than all the deaths from cancer combined. Astonishing! The #1 cancer that kills women in this country is lung cancer, and you didn’t have to be a smoker to be afflicted with it! Shocking! The good news regarding heart disease is that it is 80% preventable with lifestyle change. This is an amazing and hopeful statistic.

From practical dietary advice and an effective fitness regime, to identifying and managing heart health issues—Her HeartBeat helps put you on the road to optimum physical health. Working in conjunction with your health care professionals, she provides clear doable options for a prevention lifestyle plan tailored specifically to your needs. It’s this hands-on approach to your physical health that makes Leisha a vital part of your success.

Prevalence

Worldwide, 8.6 million women die from heart disease each year, accounting for a third of all deaths in women. Three million women die from stroke each year. Stroke accounts for more deaths among women than men (11% vs 8.4%) with additional risk for CHD unique to women related to oral contraceptive use in combination with smoking.

  • 8 million women in the US are currently living with heart disease; 35,000 are under the age of 65. Four million suffer from angina.
  • 435,000 American women have heart attacks annually; 83,000 are under the age of 65 with the average age of 70.4 years.
  • 42% of women who have heart attacks die within 1 year, compared to 24% of men.
  • Under age 50, women’s heart attacks are twice as likely as men’s to be fatal.

267,000 women die each year from heart attacks, which kill six times as many women as breast cancer. Another 31, 837 women die each year of congestive heart failure, representing 62.6% of all heart failure deaths.

  • 8 million women in the US are currently living with heart disease; 35,000 are under the age of 65. Four million suffer from angina.
  • 435,000 American women have heart attacks annually; 83,000 are under the age of 65 with the average age of 70.4 years.
  • 42% of women who have heart attacks die within 1 year, compared to 24% of men.
  • Under age 50, women’s heart attacks are twice as likely as men’s to be fatal.

267,000 women die each year from heart attacks, which kill six times as many women as breast cancer

Another 31, 837 women die each year of congestive heart failure, representing 62.6% of all heart failure deaths.

At-Risk

71% of women experience early warning signs of heart attack with sudden onset of extreme weakness that feels like the flu.

  • Nearly two-thirds of the deaths from heart attacks in women occur among those who have no history of chest pain.
  • Women who smoke risk having a heart attack 19 years earlier than non-smoking women.
  • Women with hypertension experience a risk of developing coronary heart disease 3.5 times that of females with normal blood pressure. 
  • High blood pressure is more common in women taking oral contraceptives, especially in obese women.

The first sign of a heart attack is death.

  • Nearly two-thirds of the deaths from heart attacks in women occur among those who have no history of chest pain.
  • Women who smoke risk having a heart attack 19 years earlier than non-smoking women.
  • Women with hypertension experience a risk of developing coronary heart disease 3.5 times that of females with normal blood pressure. 
  • High blood pressure is more common in women taking oral contraceptives, especially in obese women.

Women with diabetes have more than double the risk of heart attack than non- diabetic women. Diabetes doubles the risk of a second heart attack in women but not in men.

23% of white women, 38% of black women, and 36% Mexican American women are obese. Obesity leads to an increased risk of premature death due to cardiovascular problems like hypertension, stroke and coronary artery disease.

The age-adjusted rate of heart disease for African American women is 72% higher than for white women. African American women ages 55-64 are twice as likely as white women to have a heart attack and 35% more likely to suffer CAD.

Marital stress worsens the prognosis in women with heart disease.